Picasso, Poland & Pedagogy

This week, the story of one of Europe’s strangest art heists keeps getting stranger; the fate of Poland’s judges keeps getting more complicated; and a teacher in one of France’s poorest towns refuses to give up on her kids. Juliette Perchais is on the line to talk about what it’s like teaching in one of her country’s toughest schools and how she traveled the world to bring back the best educational ideas out there.

Check out her website, Stories of Inspiring Teachers — it does what it says on the tin. You can also find some reporting Katy did from Grigny here.

And last but not least, your podcast recommendations for the week:

Stammtisch

Radiolab: Tweak The Vote

Thanks for listening. 🇪🇺 ❤

March 13: The best place for our little sprouts

This week we’re imagining a better future for baby Europeans and also what might happen after the nuclear apocalypse. Jennifer Pettersson is Swedish radio maker who’s been based in Amsterdam for the last 20 years. She’s always loved living in the city — until it came to putting her kids in school there. Dutch kids are famously supposed to be the happiest in the world, but is it really true?

Since we’re planning for the future we might as look all the way ahead to Doomsday. Katy’s been chatting to Åsmund Asdal, the coordinator of Norway’s Global Seed Vault, which keeps back-ups of the world’s grains and seeds for use in case of disaster.

Also: good news for young Europeans with wanderlust, bad news for clocks, and some mile-high poetry.

Thanks for listening! If you’ve got a few minutes to spare, we’d love it if you could help us spread the word by leaving us a review on iTunes.

Jan 23: Fake snus

The Europeans let loose discussing snus and fake news. German journalist Juliane von Reppert-Bismarck tells us all about her plans to teach school kids across Europe how to spot propaganda and media bias on the internet with her new project Lie Detectors. And we delve into the world of Scandinavian snus tobacco, illegal in most of the EU. For the first time, it’s more popular in Norway than cigarettes. But why?! We find out from Kris Johansson in Oslo, and the author Christopher Snowdon is on hand to explain why this stuff is still banned around Europe despite growing evidence that it helps people quit smoking. Plus: news from Davos with the tiniest mention of T***p, and a weaponized sausage for dessert.