Stick it to the grown-ups

This week’s guest is ten years old and one of the fiercest, smartest people we’ve ever had on this podcast. Lilly Platt calls in from Zeist in the Netherlands to tell us why she’s helping to lead the tens of thousands of children across Europe striking to demand action on climate change. And from skipping school to skipping the queue, anti-money laundering expert Laure Brillaud from Transparency International is here from Brussels to cast a light on the murky world of ‘golden visas’ for sale in Europe. Plus: positive pop, bad meat, and one very happy cellist.

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Need a moment of calm? Check out this track by sexy 500-year-old composer Giovanni Pierluigi Palestrina here.

Thanks for listening. 🇪🇺 ❤

November 6: Watching Over The Night Watch

This week, the story of a painting that’s been attacked with knives, chopped up, hidden in a cave from Nazis, and has probably had beer spilled on it. It also happens to be one of the world’s greatest masterpieces. Our very special guest is Taco Dibbits, director of the Rijksmuseum, here to explain why the Netherlands’ national museum is going to be restoring The Night Watch while the whole world watches. And from Rembrandt to race, the playright Marjorie H. Morgan is on the line from Liverpool to talk about the difference between being black in Europe and black in America.

The Europeans is supported by Are We Europe, the continent’s most beautiful magazine. Type ‘europeanspod’ for a 15% discount on your copy.

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September 18: Welcome To Europe, Here Are Four Walls

There’s a big difference between a shelter and a home. After Sweden’s elections cast a spotlight on the integration of immigrants, this week we’re asking how housing and urban design can affect your ability as a newcomer to settle in a new place. Alice Pittini, research coordinator of Housing Europe, talks us through some of the best examples of housing designed to help refugees and asylum seekers get stuck in and start building new lives. We also chat about Viktor Orbán and the battle for Europe’s soul, green jargon, and French superheroes. Plus, a listener sheds some light on Dominic’s salty German food mystery.

You can read Housing Europe’s latest research on migration and housing here, and check out a neat project they’re involved with, Designing Inclusion, here.

Thanks for listening!

September 11: The Future Library

Dominic’s singing in Berlin, Katy’s painting in Paris, and a forest is quietly growing just outside Oslo. Our guest this week is Anne Beate Hovind, project manager of a strange and wonderful project in Norway involving books, trees and the passage of time. Also on the menu, Florence is taking things OFF the street food menu and Poland is harnessing the power of the howling wind. Plus, a glimmer of hope after some dark days in Chemnitz.

July 31: HEAT

We’re back! What’s cooking, Europe? Apparently the whole continent. Greece has just suffered Europe’s deadliest forest fires in a century, part of a spate of extreme weather all over the northern hemisphere. Just back from Athens, we ask incoming AFP science correspondent Patrick Galey (and his dog) whether this is the new normal. Follow @patrickgaley for the angriest climate tweets in town.

Things have been heating up in Germany too, in the form of a huge debate over identity politics. Dicle Akar, a teacher at the Berlin International School, gives us her thoughts on Turkish identity in Germany and the row over football star Mesut Özil.

Plus: how the summer’s been going for Europe’s biggest political egoes, and the bright side of the forthcoming apocalypse.

April 24: Keep your bitcoin close and your botany closer

A treasure-themed episode for you this week: the natural treasures of Poland’s ancient Białowieża forest, hidden treasures in rural France, and buried treasure on a German island.

Dominic’s been chatting to Agata Szafraniuk of environmental lawyers ClientEarth about their battle with the Polish government to protect Białowieża, one of the few remaining patches of the primeval forest that covered Europe 10,000 years ago.

Also heading into the countryside are Parisian podcaster Oliver Gee of The Earful Tower fame and his fiancee Lina Nordin, on a quest to discover the real France through a heart-shaped (awwwwww) tour of the country.

Plus: Strict Belgian gyms, 10th century bling and a bitcoin heist.

We’re being listed by Apple as a ‘new and noteworthy’ podcast for the next few weeks, woohoo! Help us make the most of it by leaving us a rating and/or review here.

Thanks so much for listening!

April 3: Trash islands and rainbow homes

“Ever wonder where plastic ends up? I have a story I’d like to share.” This week on The Europeans, the Irish journalist Naomi O’Leary describes what happened when she visited a paradise island in a remote corner of the Caribbean, only to find the entire Western world had got there first: plastic, plastic and yet more plastic. We talk about what Naomi found and what Europe can do to stop it. And since we had her here we thought we might as well quiz her about her podcast The Irish Passport, your one-stop shop for all things Irish. In Zagreb, Daniel Martinović is on the line to discuss the success of Dugine Obitelji (Rainbow Families), Croatia’s first children’s picture book showing kids with LGBT parents. Plus: the Netherlands keeps its gas underground; a London embassy keeps Julian Assange off the net; and a tale of redemption for an amateur sculptor in Madeira.