September 11: The Future Library

Dominic’s singing in Berlin, Katy’s painting in Paris, and a forest is quietly growing just outside Oslo. Our guest this week is Anne Beate Hovind, project manager of a strange and wonderful project in Norway involving books, trees and the passage of time. Also on the menu, Florence is taking things OFF the street food menu and Poland is harnessing the power of the howling wind. Plus, a glimmer of hope after some dark days in Chemnitz.

September 4: Nation Branding, Robot Dancing

This week on The Europeans: national branding done right (Sweden) and wrong (Theresa May’s robot dancing). Or will the British PM have the last laugh on that one? The jury’s still out. Swedish journalist Charlotte Boström is on the line to explain how her country successfully marketed itself as an eco-friendly feminist paradise. And as Dominic packs his bags for two months in Berlin, he and Katy talk clocks, democracy, fine food and Lego.

August 28: Greece and Fabrice

This week we’re talking about a couple of journeys. Greece has gone from the depths of despair to something a little less like despair; Nick Malkoutzis of Macropolis is on the line from Athens to explain. And Frenchman Fabrice Pothier is here to tell us about his fun (?) 700-kilometre cycle from Foie Gras country to Santander, hoping to learn a thing or two about Europe. Also: an artistic mishap, virulent success, and a discordant initative by Berlin transport authorities.

Thanks for listening!

August 21: The G-Spot of Europe

This week, sex and the internet. For once it’s not us making the filthy innuendos, although Dominic does his best. It’s Lithuania’s capital Vilnius! We ask tour guide Agneta Ladek if her city is really ‘the G-spot of Europe — nobody knows where it is, but when you find it, it’s amazing’. Dimi Dimitrov is on the line to explain why changes to the way we regulate the internet in Europe would have made life harder for Wikipedia and more boring for everyone else. And one woman is on a quest to bring some ancient Norman sass to modern-day Guernsey.

August 14: The traces they leave

This week, something a little different: Deborah Cole, a Berlin-based reporter since 1995, reads us her beautiful piece about the race to collect the memories of elderly Germans who lived through some of the most tumultuous events in modern history. Follow Deborah on Twitter, she’s our favourite person tweeting from Merkel Land.

Also: an airborne mishap, an ingenious Spaniard, and irony, Slovenian-style, explained with the help of the brilliant Aljaž Pengov Bitenc.

Your Apple reviews make our lives worth living. Add to the pile here.

 

 

 

August 7: Piss and Populism

As you’ll see in this week’s episode, we’re warming to two themes this season: urine, and the far-right.

Timo Lochocki, an expert on populism in Europe, is on the line from Berlin to talk about why we SHOULDN’T talk about Steve Bannon’s new venture on this side of the Atlantic. On a brighter note, Adrian Murphy’s here to talk about Europeana, a lovely EU culture project that is currently collecting personal stories about migrating around the continent.

Also: good times for cash-strapped Berlin parents, bad times for Shakespearean amateur voiceover artists, and a disaster averted in Katy’s hometown.

Liked the show? Please leave us five big shiny stars!

 

July 31: HEAT

We’re back! What’s cooking, Europe? Apparently the whole continent. Greece has just suffered Europe’s deadliest forest fires in a century, part of a spate of extreme weather all over the northern hemisphere. Just back from Athens, we ask incoming AFP science correspondent Patrick Galey (and his dog) whether this is the new normal. Follow @patrickgaley for the angriest climate tweets in town.

Things have been heating up in Germany too, in the form of a huge debate over identity politics. Dicle Akar, a teacher at the Berlin International School, gives us her thoughts on Turkish identity in Germany and the row over football star Mesut Özil.

Plus: how the summer’s been going for Europe’s biggest political egoes, and the bright side of the forthcoming apocalypse.